David Horton has been working in sculpture and drawing for 19 years. In 2008 he was awarded his MFA in sculpture from the National Art School. In 1999 he was awarded a BFA with a major in sculpture and the Transfield Outstanding Student prize.

Horton has been showing in Sydney since 1998. In 2007 he was awarded the major prize for Sculpture by the Sea in Bondi by Deborah Edwards for his piece 'Yesternight'. In 2009 David was a recipient of the Helen Lempriere National Sculpture Scholarship. This allowed for studio equipment to be purchased and a study tour of the collections in New York. In 2012 David was the artist in residence at Sydney Grammar. Other awards include The Waverley Art Sculpture Prize in 1998 and the Sydney Airport 2000 sculpture prize.

David was selected to show in the prestigious McClelland Sculpture survey in Melbourne in 2014 with a work responding to Verochio's 'Doubting Thomas' and the relationship between the architectural niche and figurative sculpture and in 2015 the Art Gallery Society of NSW Prize

Horton's work draws on the modernist traditions of construction and assemblage. He hopes to extend the language of this idiom by using other art works as the impetus for both sculptures and drawings. These artworks can be music, painting, drawing or figurative sculpture. Using a process of improvisation, he hopes to imbue the works with similar character via the language of abstraction. This has seen an exploration of scale from large outdoor works to more intimate small scale works


Artist's Statement

Horton's work draws on the modernist traditions of construction and assemblage. He hopes to extend the language of this idiom by using other art works as the impetus for both sculptures and drawings. These artworks can be music, painting, drawing or figurative sculpture. Using a process of improvisation, he hopes to imbue the works with similar character via the language of abstraction. This has seen an exploration of scale from large outdoor works exhibited in Sculpture by The Sea to more intimate small scale works.

The driving motivation in David Horton's work is to create something that is beautiful. He acknowledges the traditions of the religious arts and the long history of beauty in all the faiths. Using modernist conventions of collage and construction, allows Horton to explore processes of arranging steel and paper into idiosyncratic compositions.