Roni Feldman paints highly detailed yet ethereal portraits of people using airbrushed acrylic on iridescent surfaces and embellished with abstract, jewel-like marks.  As an avid nature-lover, traveler, and science fiction writer, his art explores a wide range of subject matter including nature, optics, physics, and utopia.  Feldman’s work has been featured in over a dozen solo shows and a hundred group shows in the U.S. and abroad including the Pasadena Armory Center for the Arts, Los Angeles; Garboushian Gallery, Beverly Hills, Toomey-Tourell Fine Art, San Francisco; Sloan Fine Art, New York; and Janet Clayton Gallery, Sydney, Australia, the Istanbul, Yokahama, and Mexicali Biennials, and his work was recently acquired by the Guangzhou City Art Museum in China and the Long Beach Museum of Art in California.  He has been awarded multiple prizes including the Durfee ARC Grant and his paintings are featured in numerous private and corporate collections. He lives and works in Los Angeles, CA where he teaches at Otis College of Art & Design and is plotting the sequel for his epic sci-fi/ fantasy novel, The Creator’s Eye: Mover of Fate.


Artist's Statement

Click here to view selected works by Roni Feldman

Click here to view selected works by Roni Feldman

My recent paintings include landscapes of places I have been and want to visit, as well as portraits of famous explorers.  All of the works are airbrushed with matte acrylic and collage against a metallic ground.  The combination of matte and iridescence causes subtle color shifts as viewers engage them.  Each scene is shrouded in a flurry of intuitive paint marks and collage, often inspired from interior exploration- the lights I see behind closed eyelids during moments of contemplation.  The paint marks require me to be constantly inventive, to develop and seek out new techniques.  This process fills each canvas with unexpected treasures, partially burying the iridescent painting beneath, prompting viewers to move about, look closely, and become active visual explores themselves.

My process is not just a reflection of Pluralistic freedom.  This body of work came out of a personal creative crisis that prompted me to explore.  However, there is a risk in exploration.  While my portrait subjects took on great adventures, not all of them survived their travels.  Some became tragically lost, like Shackleton, Earhart, or McCandless.  That is the risk of stepping into the wilds.  It can change you, but also destroy you.  When taken out of our comfort zone, or impressed by something new, the moment can be heightened.  It prompts self-reflection.  I challenge myself with each painting to attempt new techniques, often intuitive ones, leaving the path open to discover something better than I intended.  However this process also produces some failures, so editing and destruction is also an important part of my process.